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GROMACS 5.0.1, nVidia CUDA Toolkit, And FFTW3 Under Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (64-bit); The Virtues Of VirtualBox

September 22nd, 2014

Summarized below are the catches and fixes from a recent effort to build GROMACS 5.0.1 with FFTW3 (single- and double-precision) and GPU support (so, single-precision). Also, a trick I’ve been doing with great success lately, using a virtual machine to keep my real machine as clean as possible.

0. The Virtues Of VirtualBox

Open source means never having to say you’re sorry.

I’ve made the above proclamation to anyone who’d listen lately who has any interest in using Linux software (because, regardless of what anyone says on the matter, it ain’t there yet as an operating system for general scientific users with general computing know-how). You will very likely find yourself stuck at a configure or make step in one or more prerequisite codes to some final build you’re trying to do, leaving yourself to google error messages to try to come up with some kind of solution. Invariably, you’ll try something that seems to work, only to find it doesn’t, potentially leaving a trail of orphaned files, version-breaking changes, and random downgrading only to find something else stupid (or not) fixed your build problems.

I’ve an install I’m quite happy with that has all of the working code I want on it working – and I’ve no interest in having to perform re-installs to get back to a working state again.

My solution, which I’ve used to great success with GAMESS-US, GROMACS, NWChem, and Amber (so far), is to break a virtual instance in VirtualBox first. For those who don’t know (and briefly), VirtualBox lets you install a fully-working OS inside of your own OS that simply sits as a file in a Virtual VM folder in your user directory. My procedure has been to install a 60 GB VirtualBox instance of (currently) Ubuntu 14.04 (which I will refer to here as PROTOTYPE), fully update it to the current state of my RealBox (updates, upgrades, program installs, etc.), then copy PROTOTYPE somewhere else on the machine. The only limitation of this approach is that VirtualBox doesn’t give you access to the GPU if you’re testing CUDA-specific calculations. That said, it does let you install the CUDA Development Toolkit and compile code just fine, so you can at least work your way through a full build to make sure you don’t run into problems.

When you’re done trashing your VirtualBox after a particularly heinous build, just delete PROTOTYPE from Virtual VM and re-copy your copy back into Virtual VM – voila! You’re ready for another build operation (or to make sure your “final” build actually works flawlessly before committing the build to your RealBox.

That’s all I have to say on the matter. Consider it as your default procedure (at this point, I won’t touch my RealBox with new installs until I know it’s safe in VirtualBox).

1. The State Of My Machine Pre-GROMACS And All Other apt-get’s Used Below

What follows below is pretty straightforward. Errors you might get that don’t appear below might be related to the lack of certain installs on your machine that I installed on VirtualBox. That is, my standard PROTOTYPE comes standard with Intel’s Fortran and C Compilers (for code optimization). Those installs required a few installs above the base Ubuntu install. These are (and are pretty standard anyway, so I say install them anyway):

sudo apt-get install build-essential gcc-multilib rpm openjdk-7-jre-headless 

I could have just installed a fresh version of 14.04 onto a machine to try this myself, but I’m not that motivated. Also, note this list does not include the all-important cmake. We’ll get to that.

And for the rest of GROMACS (at least for older versions), there were lots of mesa/gnuplot/motif-specific dependencies in older versions of GROMACS to build all of the files included in the GROMACS package. Regardless of GPU builds or not, I tend to default to install all the packages below just to have them (which all, for 14.04, currently apt-get properly).

sudo apt-get install openmpi-bin openmpi-common gfortran csh grace menu x11proto-print-dev motif-clients freeglut3-dev libx11-dev libxmu-dev libxi-dev libgl1-mesa-glx libglu1-mesa libglu1-mesa-dev libgl1-mesa-dri libcurl-ocaml-dev libcurl4-gnutls-dev gnuplot

If you don’t install the libblas3gf libblas-doc libblas-dev liblapack3gf liblapack-doc liblapack-dev series, you’ll see the following note from your cmake steps in GROMACS.

— A library with BLAS API not found. Please specify library location.
— Using GROMACS built-in BLAS.
— LAPACK requires BLAS
— A library with LAPACK API not found. Please specify library location.
— Using GROMACS built-in LAPACK.

My own preference is to use the (assumedly newer) Ubuntu-specific libraries from apt-get.

sudo apt-get install libblas3gf libblas-doc libblas-dev liblapack3gf liblapack-doc liblapack-dev

GPU-Specific? One More apt-get

My first passes at proper GPU compilation involved several steps for the nVidia Developer Toolkit install. That’s now taken care of with apt-get, so perform the final apt-get to complete the component/dependency installations.

sudo apt-get install nvidia-cuda-dev nvidia-cuda-toolkit

With luck, your first attempt at a GPU-based installation will look like the following:

[0%] Building NVCC (Device) object src/gromacs/gmxlib/cuda_tools/CMakeFiles/cuda_tools.dir//./cuda_tools_generated_copyrite_gpu.cu.o

[100%] Building CXX object src/programs/CMakeFiles/gmx.dir/legacymodules.cpp.o
Linking CXX executable ../../bin/gmx
[100%] Built target gmx

2. Nothing Happens Without cmake

Install cmake! Reproducing the output below to make sure you’re using the same versions for everything (in the event something breaks in the future).

sudo apt-get install cmake

Reading package lists… Done
Building dependency tree
Reading state information… Done
The following packages were automatically installed and are no longer required:
linux-headers-3.13.0-32 linux-headers-3.13.0-32-generic
linux-image-3.13.0-32-generic linux-image-extra-3.13.0-32-generic
Use ‘apt-get autoremove’ to remove them.
The following extra packages will be installed:
cmake-data
Suggested packages:
codeblocks eclipse
The following NEW packages will be installed:
cmake cmake-data
0 upgraded, 2 newly installed, 0 to remove and 0 not upgraded.
Need to get 3,294 kB of archives.
After this operation, 16.6 MB of additional disk space will be used.
Do you want to continue? [Y/n]
Get:1 http://us.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ trusty/main cmake-data all 2.8.12.2-0ubuntu3 [676 kB]
Get:2 http://us.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ trusty/main cmake amd64 2.8.12.2-0ubuntu3 [2,618 kB]
Fetched 3,294 kB in 30s (106 kB/s)
Selecting previously unselected package cmake-data.
(Reading database … 258157 files and directories currently installed.)
Preparing to unpack …/cmake-data_2.8.12.2-0ubuntu3_all.deb …
Unpacking cmake-data (2.8.12.2-0ubuntu3) …
Selecting previously unselected package cmake.
Preparing to unpack …/cmake_2.8.12.2-0ubuntu3_amd64.deb …
Unpacking cmake (2.8.12.2-0ubuntu3) …
Processing triggers for man-db (2.6.7.1-1) …
Setting up cmake-data (2.8.12.2-0ubuntu3) …
Setting up cmake (2.8.12.2-0ubuntu3) …

3. First Pass At GROMACS

The make install step will place GROMACS where you want it on your machine, so you’re just as good building in $HOME/Downloads as you are anywhere else. I will be performing all operations from $HOME/Downloads unless otherwise stated.

According to the GROMACS Installation Manual, your quick-and-dirty install need only involve the following:

$ tar xvfz gromacs-src.tar.gz
$ ls
gromacs-src
$ mkdir build
$ cd build
$ cmake ../gromacs-src
$ make

This allows you build “out-of-source” as they put it. Frankly, I just dive right into the GROMACS folder and have at it.

CMake Error: The source directory “/home/user/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1/build” does not appear to contain CMakeLists.txt.
Specify –help for usage, or press the help button on the CMake GUI.

And did you see the above error? If so, you read the GROMACS quick-and-dirty procedure backwards. I’m not running it this way, so doesn’t matter to what follows.

My first attempt at building GROMACS produced the following output from PROTOTYPE (reproducing all the text below).

user@PROTOTYPE:~$ cd Downloads/
user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads$ gunzip gromacs-5.0.1.tar.gz 
user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads$ tar xvf gromacs-5.0.1.tar 

gromacs-5.0.1/README
gromacs-5.0.1/INSTALL

gromacs-5.0.1/tests/CppCheck.cmake
gromacs-5.0.1/tests/CMakeLists.txt

user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads$ cd gromacs-5.0.1/
user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1$ cmake -DGMX_GPU=OFF

NOTE: If you just run cmake, you’ll get the following…

cmake version 2.8.12.2
Usage

cmake [options] cmake [options]

… which is to say, cmake requires at least one option be specified. Above, I’m just using -DGMX_GPU=OFF to start the process.

The C compiler identification is GNU 4.8.2
— The CXX compiler identification is GNU 4.8.2
— Check for working C compiler: /usr/bin/cc
— Check for working C compiler: /usr/bin/cc — works
— Detecting C compiler ABI info
— Detecting C compiler ABI info – done
— Check for working CXX compiler: /usr/bin/c++
— Check for working CXX compiler: /usr/bin/c++ — works
— Detecting CXX compiler ABI info
— Detecting CXX compiler ABI info – done
— Checking for GCC x86 inline asm
— Checking for GCC x86 inline asm – supported
— Detecting best SIMD instructions for this CPU
— Detected best SIMD instructions for this CPU – SSE2
— Try OpenMP C flag = [-fopenmp]
— Performing Test OpenMP_FLAG_DETECTED
— Performing Test OpenMP_FLAG_DETECTED – Success
— Try OpenMP CXX flag = [-fopenmp]
— Performing Test OpenMP_FLAG_DETECTED
— Performing Test OpenMP_FLAG_DETECTED – Success
— Found OpenMP: -fopenmp
— Performing Test CFLAGS_WARN
— Performing Test CFLAGS_WARN – Success
— Performing Test CFLAGS_WARN_EXTRA
— Performing Test CFLAGS_WARN_EXTRA – Success
— Performing Test CFLAGS_WARN_REL
— Performing Test CFLAGS_WARN_REL – Success
— Performing Test CFLAGS_WARN_UNINIT
— Performing Test CFLAGS_WARN_UNINIT – Success
— Performing Test CFLAGS_EXCESS_PREC
— Performing Test CFLAGS_EXCESS_PREC – Success
— Performing Test CFLAGS_COPT
— Performing Test CFLAGS_COPT – Success
— Performing Test CFLAGS_NOINLINE
— Performing Test CFLAGS_NOINLINE – Success
— Performing Test CXXFLAGS_WARN
— Performing Test CXXFLAGS_WARN – Success
— Performing Test CXXFLAGS_WARN_EXTRA
— Performing Test CXXFLAGS_WARN_EXTRA – Success
— Performing Test CXXFLAGS_WARN_REL
— Performing Test CXXFLAGS_WARN_REL – Success
— Performing Test CXXFLAGS_EXCESS_PREC
— Performing Test CXXFLAGS_EXCESS_PREC – Success
— Performing Test CXXFLAGS_COPT
— Performing Test CXXFLAGS_COPT – Success
— Performing Test CXXFLAGS_NOINLINE
— Performing Test CXXFLAGS_NOINLINE – Success
— Looking for include file unistd.h
— Looking for include file unistd.h – found
— Looking for include file pwd.h
— Looking for include file pwd.h – found
— Looking for include file dirent.h
— Looking for include file dirent.h – found
— Looking for include file time.h
— Looking for include file time.h – found
— Looking for include file sys/time.h
— Looking for include file sys/time.h – found
— Looking for include file io.h
— Looking for include file io.h – not found
— Looking for include file sched.h
— Looking for include file sched.h – found
— Looking for include file regex.h
— Looking for include file regex.h – found
— Looking for C++ include regex
— Looking for C++ include regex – not found
— Looking for posix_memalign
— Looking for posix_memalign – found
— Looking for memalign
— Looking for memalign – found
— Looking for _aligned_malloc
— Looking for _aligned_malloc – not found
— Looking for gettimeofday
— Looking for gettimeofday – found
— Looking for fsync
— Looking for fsync – found
— Looking for _fileno
— Looking for _fileno – not found
— Looking for fileno
— Looking for fileno – found
— Looking for _commit
— Looking for _commit – not found
— Looking for sigaction
— Looking for sigaction – found
— Looking for sysconf
— Looking for sysconf – found
— Looking for rsqrt
— Looking for rsqrt – not found
— Looking for rsqrtf
— Looking for rsqrtf – not found
— Looking for sqrtf
— Looking for sqrtf – not found
— Looking for sqrt in m
— Looking for sqrt in m – found
— Looking for clock_gettime in rt
— Looking for clock_gettime in rt – found
— Checking for sched.h GNU affinity API
— Performing Test sched_affinity_compile
— Performing Test sched_affinity_compile – Success
— Check if the system is big endian
— Searching 16 bit integer
— Looking for sys/types.h
— Looking for sys/types.h – found
— Looking for stdint.h
— Looking for stdint.h – found
— Looking for stddef.h
— Looking for stddef.h – found
— Check size of unsigned short
— Check size of unsigned short – done
— Using unsigned short
— Check if the system is big endian – little endian
— Found LibXml2: /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libxml2.so (found version “2.9.1”)
— Looking for xmlTextWriterEndAttribute in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libxml2.so
— Looking for xmlTextWriterEndAttribute in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libxml2.so – found
— Looking for include file libxml/parser.h
— Looking for include file libxml/parser.h – found
— Looking for include file pthread.h
— Looking for include file pthread.h – found
— Looking for pthread_create
— Looking for pthread_create – not found
— Looking for pthread_create in pthreads
— Looking for pthread_create in pthreads – not found
— Looking for pthread_create in pthread
— Looking for pthread_create in pthread – found
— Found Threads: TRUE
— Looking for include file pthread.h
— Looking for include file pthread.h – found
— Atomic operations found
— Performing Test PTHREAD_SETAFFINITY
— Performing Test PTHREAD_SETAFFINITY – Success
— Could NOT find Boost
Boost >= 1.44 not found. Using minimal internal version. This may cause trouble if you plan on compiling/linking other software that uses Boost against Gromacs.
— Looking for zlibVersion in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libz.so
— Looking for zlibVersion in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libz.so – found
— Setting build user/date/host/cpu information
— Setting build user & time – OK
— Checking floating point format
— Checking floating point format – IEEE754 (LE byte, LE word)
— Checking for 64-bit off_t
— Checking for 64-bit off_t – present
— Checking for fseeko/ftello
— Checking for fseeko/ftello – present
— Checking for SIGUSR1
— Checking for SIGUSR1 – found
— Checking for pipe support
— Checking for isfinite
— Performing Test isfinite_compile_ok
— Performing Test isfinite_compile_ok – Success
— Checking for isfinite – yes
— Checking for _isfinite
— Performing Test _isfinite_compile_ok
— Performing Test _isfinite_compile_ok – Failed
— Checking for _isfinite – no
— Checking for _finite
— Performing Test _finite_compile_ok
— Performing Test _finite_compile_ok – Failed
— Checking for _finite – no
— Performing Test CXXFLAG_STD_CXX0X
— Performing Test CXXFLAG_STD_CXX0X – Success
— Performing Test GMX_CXX11_SUPPORTED
— Performing Test GMX_CXX11_SUPPORTED – Success
— Checking for system XDR support
— Checking for system XDR support – present
— Try C compiler SSE2 flag = [-msse2]
— Performing Test C_FLAG_msse2
— Performing Test C_FLAG_msse2 – Success
— Performing Test C_SIMD_COMPILES_FLAG_msse2
— Performing Test C_SIMD_COMPILES_FLAG_msse2 – Success
— Try C++ compiler SSE2 flag = [-msse2]
— Performing Test CXX_FLAG_msse2
— Performing Test CXX_FLAG_msse2 – Success
— Performing Test CXX_SIMD_COMPILES_FLAG_msse2
— Performing Test CXX_SIMD_COMPILES_FLAG_msse2 – Success
— Enabling SSE2 SIMD instructions
— Performing Test _callconv___vectorcall
— Performing Test _callconv___vectorcall – Failed
— Performing Test _callconv___regcall
— Performing Test _callconv___regcall – Failed
— Performing Test _callconv_
— Performing Test _callconv_ – Success
— checking for module ‘fftw3f’
— package ‘fftw3f’ not found
— pkg-config could not detect fftw3f, trying generic detection
Could not find fftw3f library named libfftw3f, please specify its location in CMAKE_PREFIX_PATH or FFTWF_LIBRARY by hand (e.g. -DFFTWF_LIBRARY=’/path/to/libfftw3f.so’)
CMake Error at cmake/gmxManageFFTLibraries.cmake:76 (MESSAGE):
Cannot find FFTW 3 (with correct precision – libfftw3f for mixed-precision
GROMACS or libfftw3 for double-precision GROMACS). Either choose the right
precision, choose another FFT(W) library (-DGMX_FFT_LIBRARY), enable the
advanced option to let GROMACS build FFTW 3 for you
(-GMX_BUILD_OWN_FFTW=ON), or use the really slow GROMACS built-in fftpack
library (-DGMX_FFT_LIBRARY=fftpack).
Call Stack (most recent call first):
CMakeLists.txt:733 (include)

— Configuring incomplete, errors occurred!
See also “/home/user/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1/CMakeFiles/CMakeOutput.log”.
See also “/home/user/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1/CMakeFiles/CMakeError.log”.

Lots of little things to address here. We’ll get to the Boost problem later. Meantime, you can see the critical error is in (1) the lack of FFTW3 and (2) the lack of my specifically asking for -DGMX_BUILD_OWN_FFTW=ON in the cmake process.

NOTE: If you try to fix the FFTW3 problem as described above, you’ll get the following error:

-GMX_BUILD_OWN_FFTW=ON

CMake Error: Could not create named generator MX_BUILD_OWN_FFTW=ON

Make sure to put the “D” in:

-DGMX_BUILD_OWN_FFTW=ON

4. If You Don’t Use DGMX_BUILD_OWN_FFTW=ON To Build FFTW3…

This is a skip-able section if you’re letting cmake do the dirty work (and letting cmake do it is preferred, at least for getting GROMACS built). In trying sudo apt-get install fftw*, you see (currently) the following: fftw2 fftw-dev fftw-docs

No good. So, the procedure is to build FFTW3 from source (which is just as easy as installing from .deb or .rpm files if you installed everything I mentioned above). That said, your attempts to build FFTW3 and build GROMACS may have run into several errors because of how you built FFTW3. Beginning with your extracting and prep for make:

user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads$ tar xvf fftw-3.3.4.tar 
user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads$ cd fftw-3.3.4/

Any of the combinations below produce the same error:

user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads/fftw-3.3.4$ ./configure 
user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads/fftw-3.3.4$ ./configure -enable-shared=yes
user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads/fftw-3.3.4$ ./configure --enable-threads --enable-float

checking for a BSD-compatible install… /usr/bin/install -c
checking whether build environment is sane… yes

config.status: executing depfiles commands
config.status: executing libtool commands

user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1$ cmake -DGMX_GPU=OFF
user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1$ cmake -DGMX_GPU=OFF -DFFTWF_LIBRARY='/usr/local/lib/libfftw3.a'

— The C compiler identification is GNU 4.8.2
— The CXX compiler identification is GNU 4.8.2
— Check for working C compiler: /usr/bin/cc

— Performing Test PTHREAD_SETAFFINITY
— Performing Test PTHREAD_SETAFFINITY – Success
— Could NOT find Boost
Boost >= 1.44 not found. Using minimal internal version. This may cause trouble if you plan on compiling/linking other software that uses Boost against Gromacs.
— Looking for zlibVersion in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libz.so
— Looking for zlibVersion in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libz.so – found

— checking for module ‘fftw3f’
— package ‘fftw3f’ not found
— pkg-config could not detect fftw3f, trying generic detection
Could not find fftw3f library named libfftw3f, please specify its location in CMAKE_PREFIX_PATH or FFTWF_LIBRARY by hand (e.g. -DFFTWF_LIBRARY=’/path/to/libfftw3f.so’)
CMake Error at cmake/gmxManageFFTLibraries.cmake:76 (MESSAGE):
Cannot find FFTW 3 (with correct precision – libfftw3f for mixed-precision
GROMACS or libfftw3 for double-precision GROMACS). Either choose the right
precision, choose another FFT(W) library (-DGMX_FFT_LIBRARY), enable the
advanced option to let GROMACS build FFTW 3 for you
(-GMX_BUILD_OWN_FFTW=ON), or use the really slow GROMACS built-in fftpack
library (-DGMX_FFT_LIBRARY=fftpack).
Call Stack (most recent call first):
CMakeLists.txt:733 (include)

— Configuring incomplete, errors occurred!
See also “/home/user/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1/CMakeFiles/CMakeOutput.log”.
See also “/home/user/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1/CMakeFiles/CMakeError.log”.

Including –enable-shared takes care of this error and gets you to a successful GROMACS build.

user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads/fftw-3.3.4$ ./configure --enable-threads --enable-float --enable-shared

— The C compiler identification is GNU 4.8.2
— The CXX compiler identification is GNU 4.8.2
— Check for working C compiler: /usr/bin/cc

— Performing Test PTHREAD_SETAFFINITY
— Performing Test PTHREAD_SETAFFINITY – Success
— Could NOT find Boost
Boost >= 1.44 not found. Using minimal internal version. This may cause trouble if you plan on compiling/linking other software that uses Boost against Gromacs.
— Looking for zlibVersion in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libz.so
— Looking for zlibVersion in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libz.so – found

— checking for module ‘fftw3f’
— found fftw3f, version 3.3.4
— Looking for fftwf_plan_r2r_1d in /usr/local/lib/libfftw3f.so
— Looking for fftwf_plan_r2r_1d in /usr/local/lib/libfftw3f.so – found
— Looking for fftwf_have_simd_avx in /usr/local/lib/libfftw3f.so
— Looking for fftwf_have_simd_avx in /usr/local/lib/libfftw3f.so – not found
— Looking for fftwf_have_simd_sse2 in /usr/local/lib/libfftw3f.so
— Looking for fftwf_have_simd_sse2 in /usr/local/lib/libfftw3f.so – not found
— Looking for fftwf_have_simd_avx in /usr/local/lib/libfftw3f.so
— Looking for fftwf_have_simd_avx in /usr/local/lib/libfftw3f.so – not found
— Looking for fftwf_have_simd_altivec in /usr/local/lib/libfftw3f.so
— Looking for fftwf_have_simd_altivec in /usr/local/lib/libfftw3f.so – not found
— Looking for fftwf_have_simd_neon in /usr/local/lib/libfftw3f.so
— Looking for fftwf_have_simd_neon in /usr/local/lib/libfftw3f.so – not found
— Looking for fftwf_have_sse2 in /usr/local/lib/libfftw3f.so
— Looking for fftwf_have_sse2 in /usr/local/lib/libfftw3f.so – not found
— Looking for fftwf_have_sse in /usr/local/lib/libfftw3f.so
— Looking for fftwf_have_sse in /usr/local/lib/libfftw3f.so – not found
— Looking for fftwf_have_altivec in /usr/local/lib/libfftw3f.so
— Looking for fftwf_have_altivec in /usr/local/lib/libfftw3f.so – not found
CMake Warning at cmake/gmxManageFFTLibraries.cmake:89 (message):
The fftw library found is compiled without SIMD support, which makes it
slow. Consider recompiling it or contact your admin
Call Stack (most recent call first):
CMakeLists.txt:733 (include)

— Using external FFT library – FFTW3
— Looking for sgemm_

— Configuring done
— Generating done
— Build files have been written to: /home/user/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1

And out of a first-pass GROMACS build…

user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1$ cmake -DGMX_GPU=OFF

Scanning dependencies of target libgromacs
[0%] Building C object src/gromacs/CMakeFiles/libgromacs.dir/__/external/tng_io/src/compression/bwlzh.c.o
[0%] Building C object src/gromacs/CMakeFiles/libgromacs.dir/__/external/tng_io/src/compression/bwt.c.o

[100%] Building CXX object src/programs/CMakeFiles/gmx.dir/legacymodules.cpp.o
Linking CXX executable ../../bin/gmx
[100%] Built target gmx

5. But You Let cmake Build FFTW3. So, Continuing The Build Process

With all of the dependencies above installed, the one note I wanted to address was that for Boost:


— Performing Test PTHREAD_SETAFFINITY – Success
— Could NOT find Boost
Boost >= 1.44 not found. Using minimal internal version. This may cause trouble if you plan on compiling/linking other software that uses Boost against Gromacs.
— Looking for zlibVersion in /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libz.so

It certainly isn’t a major issue, but I wanted to try to get an warning-free build. Installing Boost 1.56 produced the following negative result:

user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads/boost_1_56_0$ ./bootstrap.sh 

Building Boost.Build engine with toolset gcc… tools/build/src/engine/bin.linuxx86_64/b2
Detecting Python version… 2.7
Detecting Python root… /usr
Unicode/ICU support for Boost.Regex?… not found.
Generating Boost.Build configuration in project-config.jam…

Bootstrapping is done. To build, run:

./b2

To adjust configuration, edit ‘project-config.jam’.
Further information:

– Command line help:
./b2 –help

– Getting started guide:

http://www.boost.org/more/getting_started/unix-variants.html

– Boost.Build documentation:

http://www.boost.org/boost-build2/doc/html/index.html

user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads/boost_1_56_0$ sudo ./b2 install

Performing configuration checks

– 32-bit : no (cached)
– 64-bit : yes (cached)
– arm : no (cached)

…failed updating 58 targets…
…skipped 12 targets…
…updated 11322 targets…

user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1$ cmake -DGMX_GPU=ON -DGMX_DOUBLE=OFF
user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1$ make

[0%] Building NVCC (Device) object src/gromacs/gmxlib/cuda_tools/CMakeFiles/cuda_tools.dir//./cuda_tools_generated_copyrite_gpu.cu.o
[0%] Building NVCC (Device) object src/gromacs/gmxlib/cuda_tools/CMakeFiles/cuda_tools.dir//./cuda_tools_generated_pmalloc_cuda.cu.o

[7%] Building CXX object src/gromacs/CMakeFiles/libgromacs.dir/commandline/cmdlinehelpwriter.cpp.o
In file included from /home/user/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1/src/gromacs/options/basicoptions.h:52:0,
from /home/user/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1/src/gromacs/commandline/cmdlinehelpwriter.cpp:55:
/home/user/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1/src/gromacs/options/../utility/gmxassert.h:47:57: fatal error: boost/exception/detail/attribute_noreturn.hpp: No such file or directory
#include
^
compilation terminated.
make[2]: *** [src/gromacs/CMakeFiles/libgromacs.dir/commandline/cmdlinehelpwriter.cpp.o] Error 1
make[1]: *** [src/gromacs/CMakeFiles/libgromacs.dir/all] Error 2
make: *** [all] Error 2

Sadly, the solution is to then include -DGMX_EXTERNAL_BOOST=off and stick with the internal boost, which then “makes” just fine. One page references the use of -DGMX_INTERNAL_BOOST=on, but that produced the following:

CMake Warning:
Manually-specified variables were not used by the project:

GMX_INTERNAL_BOOST

— Build files have been written to: /home/user/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1

There’s more on this issue at: gerrit.gromacs.org/#/c/1232/ and t24960.science-biology-gromacs-development.biotalk.us/compiling-boost-problem-and-error-with-icc-t24960.html, but I’ve opted not to worry about it.

So, with Boost installed, I simply ignore it (and have not installed Boost on my RealBox).

user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1$ cmake -DGMX_GPU=ON -DGMX_EXTERNAL_BOOST=off

6. Finishing Step If All Above Goes Well: CUDA-Based GROMACS Build

If everything else above has gone smoothly (and if you ignored the Boost install. If you didn’t, remember to add -DGMX_EXTERNAL_BOOST=off to the cmake below), you should be able to cleanly run a cmake for a GPU version of GROMACS (below, with the final result to be placed into /opt/gromacs_gpu. You then specify the $PATH after and run with it).

user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1$ cmake -DGMX_GPU=ON -DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX=/opt/gromacs_gpu -DGMX_BUILD_OWN_FFTW=ON

— The C compiler identification is GNU 4.8.2
— The CXX compiler identification is GNU 4.8.2

— Generating done
— Build files have been written to: /home/damianallis/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1

user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1$ make

The make starts with the FFTW3 download and build…

Scanning dependencies of target fftwBuild
[ 0%] Performing pre-download step for ‘fftwBuild’
— downloading…
src=’http://www.fftw.org/fftw-3.3.3.tar.gz’
dest=’/home/damianallis/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1/src/contrib/fftw/fftw.tar.gz’
— [download 0% complete]

[100%] Building CXX object src/programs/CMakeFiles/gmx.dir/legacymodules.cpp.o
Linking CXX executable ../../bin/gmx
[100%] Built target gmx

Finally, your (sudo) make install places everything into /opt/gromacs_gpu.

user@PROTOTYPE:~/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1$ sudo make install

— The GROMACS-managed build of FFTW 3 will configure with the following optimizations: –enable-sse2
— Configuring done
— Generating done
— Build files have been written to: /home/damianallis/Downloads/gromacs-5.0.1
[1%] Built target fftwBuild

[100%] Building CXX object src/programs/CMakeFiles/gmx.dir/legacymodules.cpp.o
Linking CXX executable ../../bin/gmx
[100%] Built target gmx

For The Windows-Specific: Sed For Windows And A .bat File To Get Gaussian09 Files Working With aClimax

September 3rd, 2014

Provided you’ve installed Sed For Windows and know its proper path, the .bat file below should make all the modifications you need to your Gaussian09 .out files (in differently-named files at that) to get them properly loading in aClimax (see the previous post for all the details). A few simple steps:

1. Download and install Sed for Windows. Currently available at: gnuwin32.sourceforge.net/packages/sed.htm

2. Find its location on your machine. Under XP (where I’m using aClimax), this should be C:\Program Files\GnuWin32\bin

3. Copy + paste the text below into Notepad and save that as “aClimax_converter.bat” or something. NOTE: The quotes are IMPORTANT! You risk saving the file as an aClimax_converter.bat.txt file otherwise. The pause is optional. If there’s something wrong with the conversion, keeping the pause will let you see the error. If, by some miracle, your Sed is installed elsewhere, change the PATH statement below. The .aclimaxconversion_step1 file will be deleted (just there for doing sequential Sed’ing in case additional modifications are needed in the future).

PATH=C:\Program Files\GnuWin32\bin;
sed.exe "s/  Atom  AN/ Atom AN /g" %1 > %1.aclimaxconversion_step1
sed.exe "s/ Atom   / Atom/g" %1.aclimaxconversion_step1 > %1.aClimaxable.out
del %1.aclimaxconversion_step1
pause

4. If the path is right, just drag + drop your .out files onto the .bat file (with a shortcut to the .bat file, or place a copy of the file in your working directory).

5. Finally, try opening one of the .aClimaxeable.out files in aClimax and report back if you’ve any problems.

Stupid-Simple (*nix-Specific) Sed Scripts To Get (All Current) Gaussian09 Output Files Working With aClimax

September 1st, 2014

The following three snippets of Gaussian output are for an optimization and normal mode analysis of simple olde methane (CH4).

...
 ******************************************
 Gaussian 03:  EM64L-G03RevE.01 11-Sep-2007
                31-Aug-2014 
 ******************************************
...
 incident light, reduced masses (AMU), force constants (mDyne/A),
 and normal coordinates:
                     1                      2                      3
                     T                      T                      T
 Frequencies --  1356.0070              1356.0070              1356.0070
 Red. masses --     1.1789                 1.1789                 1.1789
 Frc consts  --     1.2771                 1.2771                 1.2771
 IR Inten    --    14.1122                14.1122                14.1122
 Atom AN      X      Y      Z        X      Y      Z        X      Y      Z
   1   1     0.02  -0.42   0.43    -0.34  -0.13  -0.08    -0.36  -0.23  -0.23
   2   6     0.00   0.08  -0.09     0.00   0.09   0.08     0.12   0.00   0.00
...
 -------------------
 - Thermochemistry -
 -------------------
 Temperature   298.150 Kelvin.  Pressure   1.00000 Atm.
 Atom  1 has atomic number  1 and mass   1.00783
...
...
 ******************************************
 Gaussian 09:  EM64L-G09RevA.02 11-Jun-2009
                31-Aug-2014 
 ******************************************
...
 incident light, reduced masses (AMU), force constants (mDyne/A),
 and normal coordinates:
                     1                      2                      3
                     T                      T                      T
 Frequencies --  1356.0058              1356.0058              1356.0058
 Red. masses --     1.1789                 1.1789                 1.1789
 Frc consts  --     1.2771                 1.2771                 1.2771
 IR Inten    --    14.1123                14.1123                14.1123
  Atom  AN      X      Y      Z        X      Y      Z        X      Y      Z
     1   1    -0.03   0.42   0.43    -0.34  -0.14   0.07    -0.36  -0.23   0.23
     2   6     0.00  -0.08  -0.10     0.01   0.10  -0.08     0.12   0.00   0.00
...
-------------------
 - Thermochemistry -
 -------------------
 Temperature   298.150 Kelvin.  Pressure   1.00000 Atm.
 Atom     1 has atomic number  1 and mass   1.00783
...
...
 ******************************************
 Gaussian 09:  EM64L-G09RevD.01 24-Apr-2013
                31-Aug-2014 
 ******************************************
...
 incident light, reduced masses (AMU), force constants (mDyne/A),
 and normal coordinates:
                      1                      2                      3
                     ?A                     ?A                     ?A
 Frequencies --   1356.0132              1356.0132              1356.0132
 Red. masses --      1.1789                 1.1789                 1.1789
 Frc consts  --      1.2771                 1.2771                 1.2771
 IR Inten    --     14.1119                14.1119                14.1119
  Atom  AN      X      Y      Z        X      Y      Z        X      Y      Z
     1   1     0.02   0.42   0.43     0.34  -0.14   0.08    -0.36   0.23  -0.23
     2   6     0.00  -0.08  -0.09    -0.01   0.09  -0.08     0.12   0.00   0.00
...
 -------------------
 - Thermochemistry -
 -------------------
 Temperature   298.150 Kelvin.  Pressure   1.00000 Atm.
 Atom     1 has atomic number  1 and mass   1.00783
...

Two of these things are not like the other. The data’s nearly identical (and thank heavens. Unfortunately, Gaussian09 D.01 didn’t see the fully-optimized methane as belonging to the Td point group – despite all three versions being run with the same exact input file – but a rigorous re-symmetrization would have taken care of that), but there are some subtle formatting differences between all three versions (including differences between both Gaussian09 versions) that cause the venerable, all-encompassing aClimax program (developed by Timmy, the venerable, all-encompassing A. J. Ramirez-Cuesta) to throw out the following errors for all three cases when you use *.log files from a *nix (UNIX, Linux) machine.

Serious Error: A-CLIMAX has encountered an unhanded error. Please Save your data and contact support
aClimax: Quote Error Number 9
Error Loading File: Error reading data. Please check and try again.
aClimax: WARNING loaded file containing no frequencies

Problem number 1 is the existence of *nix newlines (carriage returns) in the *.log files coming off a *nix machine. Performing a conversion from *nix to DOS (for myself, using LineBreak in OSX, but tofrodos works just as well), the Gaussian03 file now opens just fine in aClimax:

File Loaded: Data Loaded Succesfully [sic].

This, unfortunately, does not improve the matter with the Gaussian09 files, which produce the following error:

Error: One of the numbers you have entered is of the wrong type.Please recheck and try again
Error Loading File: Error reading data. Please check and try again.

Given how little of the .log file aClimax actually needs to produce simulated inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra, I ran the methane normal mode analyses in three different Gaussian versions to determine what, in G09, was changed to make it just un-G03 enough to fail to load. With those changes figured out, I had a Perl script drafted up that would have converted everything back to the original G03 format. It was awesome. That said, after a small amount of testing to see where aClimax’s sensitivities lay, I discovered that very little of the .log file contents needed to be changed out, meaning that simple sed scripts would work just as well for those of us using our Windows boxes (or VirtualBox emulations) only for that “one stupid program” that keeps us having to log in (and, by that, I mean that we have sed already on our computers).

So, the problems between G09 and aClimax not related to carriage returns lie in two places.

1. The spacing of “Atom AN” – at the top of the eigenvector lists are the column labels, beginning with “Atom AN” – or something very close to “Atom AN” (the “|” in the boxes below mark the left edge of the output):

G03 E01 | Atom AN
G09 A02 |   Atom  AN
G09 D01 |  Atom  AN

Yes, the addition of a space or two results in a read error by aClimax. I would call this an… aggressive stringency in aClimax. That said, what did the original space in G03 versions not do that they do do in G09?

2. The spacing of “Atom N” – In the “Thermochemistry” section below the eigenvectors, atomic masses are listed as “Atom N” – or something very close to “Atom N” (again, the “|” in the boxes below mark the left edge of the output):

G03 E01 |  Atom  1
G09 A02 |    Atom     1
G09 D01 |   Atom     1

This change in spacing is also enough to cause aClimax to error out.

The Solution

A small sed script performs the necessary conversions on your *nix box (including OSX) for all .log files in a directory without issue:

#!/bin/sh

# This section converts all .log files to aClimax-friendly G03-ish format
find . -type f -name '*.log' -print | while read i
do
sed 's|  Atom  AN| Atom AN |g' $i > $i.aclimaxconversion_step1
sed 's| Atom   | Atom|g' $i.aclimaxconversion_step1 > $i.aClimaxable.log
rm $i.aclimaxconversion_step1
done

# This section converts all .out files to aClimax-friendly G03-ish format
find . -type f -name '*.out' -print | while read i
do
sed 's|  Atom  AN| Atom AN |g' $i > $i.aclimaxconversion_step1
sed 's| Atom   | Atom|g' $i.aclimaxconversion_step1 > $i.aClimaxable.out
rm $i.aclimaxconversion_step1
done

But Wait! Running G0* Jobs Under *nix? Convert To DOS Carriage Returns

The final problem halting your aClimax spectrum generation is the DOS carriage return (^M). For those running DOS-based Gaussian calculations (likely with a .out suffix), your conversion with the short script above (under *nix) likely (hopefully) worked just fine. For those running under *nix, you performed the conversion and still received the following aClimax error:

Serious Error: A-CLIMAX has encountered an unhanded error. Please Save your data and contact support
aClimax: Quote Error Number 9
Error Loading File: Error reading data. Please check and try again.
aClimax: WARNING loaded file containing no frequencies

The solution is an additional line in the sed script that will globally replace all *nix newlines with proper DOS carriage returns. The .out section remains the same.

#!/bin/sh

# This section converts all .log files to aClimax-friendly G03-ish format
find . -type f -name '*.log' -print | while read i
do
sed 's|  Atom  AN| Atom AN |g' $i > $i.aclimaxconversion_step1
sed 's| Atom   | Atom|g' $i.aclimaxconversion_step1 > $i.aclimaxconversion_step2
# This section converts your *nix newlines into DOS carriage returns
CR=`echo "\0015"`  # define the Carriage Return
sed -e "s/$/${CR}/g" $i.aclimaxconversion_step2 > $i.aClimaxable.log
done
# this cleans up your folder of temp files
rm *.aclimaxconversion_step1
rm *.aclimaxconversion_step2

# This section converts all .out files to aClimax-friendly G03-ish format
find . -type f -name '*.out' -print | while read i
do
sed 's|  Atom  AN| Atom AN |g' $i > $i.aclimaxconversion_step1
sed 's| Atom   | Atom|g' $i.aclimaxconversion_step1 > $i.aClimaxable.out
rm $i.aclimaxconversion_step1
done

Q. But what if I run the *nix-to-DOS version of the script on an already DOS-output file?

A1. The simple answer is that you’ll make your text file double-spaced (which is bad enough). aClimax will then provide the following error when you try to open it:

Error Reading File: Unexpected File End. File May be incorrect or corrupt.
Error Loading File: Error reading data. Please check and try again.

A2. I will assume that your problem is that you’re running the script in DOS to try to get your G09 to read more like G03. In this case (assuming you’re generating .out files), you’ll want to use a text editor to make the replacements described above (which is to say, that Perl script might makes it way to this page eventually. If you write a DOS .bat file or similar script for all OS’s, I’d be happy to link to it).

Remembering The Godfather Of Solar Astronomy, Robert “Barlow Bob” Godfrey

June 20th, 2014

As appeared on the CNY Observers & Observing website on 20 June 2014:

The field of amateur astronomy hosts many different personalities. Some love to know anything and everything about astronomy equipment. Some prefer the study of astronomy through the ages. Some enjoy the banter around a large scope with others at midnight. Some enjoy the quiet solitude of a small dome or open field. Still others enjoy setting their equipment up in the middle of the chaos of a large group of people to show them the sights. Some take their love of outreach well past the observing field, taking it upon themselves to educate others by taking what they know (or don’t yet know) and making it accessible to the larger audience of amateurs and non-observers alike.

Amateur astronomy has seen a few key players pass this year, starting with John Dobson this past January and the noted comet hunter Bill Bradfield just a week ago. Both are noteworthy in their passing in that, amongst a large, large number of astro-hobbyists, their names are held in higher esteem because of their unique contributions to amateur astronomy. In the case of Bill Bradfield, he singly was responsible for finding 18 comets that bear his name, making him responsible for helping map part of the contents of our own Solar System from his home in Australia (reportedly taking 3500 hours to do so). In the case of John Dobson, he not only synthesized many great ideas in scope building with his own to produce the class of telescope that bears his name, but he also made it part of his life’s work to bring the distant heavens to anyone and everyone through his founding of what we call today “sidewalk astronomy.”

2014june20_barlowbob_5_small

Barlow Bob at the center of the 2014 NEAF Solar Star Party. Click for a larger view.

The CNY amateur astronomy community learned of the passing of Barlow Bob on June 13th through an email from Chuck Higgins of MVAS. I suspect most people in the community didn’t even know his real name was Robert Godfrey until the announcement of his passing. The announcement of his passing had much farther to go, as the list of people and clubs that Barlow Bob had made better through his own outreach is as large as his many contributions to solar astronomy. For the record, below is a snippet of his contributions to the CNY astronomy community generally and to me specifically.

The Postman And Telephone Operator of Northeast Astronomy

I have a decent handle on all of the astronomy clubs in the Northeast thanks to Barlow Bob’s habit of forwarding newsletters and email announcements around to his email list. Those who’ve not edited a club newsletter do not know how much this simple gesture was appreciated! In my 2008 reboot of the Syracuse Astronomical Society newsletter the Astronomical Chronicle, the biggest problem facing its monthly continuation was new content. Not only did Barlow Bob provide a steady stream of articles for “Barlow Bob’s Corner,” but I learned about several free sources of space science news from these other newsletters (the NASA News Feed and the NASA Space Place being chief among them – still sources of news and updates freely available to all). He saved myself, and the SAS, several months of organizing content and finding relevant material. Those newsletters remain available in PDF format on the SAS website, many peppered with varied hot topics in solar astronomy that Barlow Bob chose to write about for “Barlow Bob’s Corner.”

As part of his aggregative exploits, amateur astronomers in his email loop were also treated to a yearly events calendar of nearly all of the East Coast star parties and special events. His and Chuck Higgins’ 2014 Events Calendar makes up the majority of the non-celestial phenomena listed in CNYO’s current calendar.

I also had the pleasure of being one of the recipients of his many (many!) phone calls as a regular of his “astro-rounds” call list, during which I learned early on to have a pen and paper ready for all of the companies to check out and solar projects to search for. Barlow Bob loved being on the edge of solar observing technology, both in pure observational astronomy and in solar spectroscopy (his Solar Spectroscopy History article is among the most concise stories of the history of the field). A number of his voice messages lasted little more than 15 seconds, but provided enough detail for a requisite google search and email exchange after.

“You keep writing them, I’ll keep publishing them.”

Barlow Bob was, by all metrics, a prolific writer on the topic of solar astronomy. My Barlow Bob CD contains at least 50 full articles along with pictures, equipment reviews, and society newsletters including his articles. Barlow Bob took great pleasure equally in his own understanding some aspect of solar astronomy and his committing that understanding to keyboard and computer screen for others. While many amateur astronomers delight in knowing something well enough to be able to talk about it with authority, precious few in the community actually take the next step and distill all they know into something others far beyond their immediate sphere can appreciate. Even those who’ve never been to NEAF likely knew of Barlow Bob through his writings. Along with his founding of the NEAF Solar Star Party, his many articles will serve as his lasting contribution to the field. We will continue to include Barlow Bob’s articles on the CNYO website and we hope that other societies will consider doing the same. Some of those articles are available on his dedicated webpage at NEAF Solar, http://www.neafsolar.com/barlowbob.html.

The Bob-o-Scope Comes To Syracuse

2014june20_barlowbob_3_small

Barlow Bob and “the works” at Darling Hill Observatory. Click for a larger view.

While Syracuse only managed to have one solar session hosted by Barlow Bob, that one session provided a number of lasting memories. After a few months of planning around available weekends and Barlow Bob’s own vacation schedule, we finally settled on the early afternoon of 30 July 2011 for a solar session (with a lecture by CNY’s own Bob Piekiel to follow that evening, making for one of the better amateur astronomy weekends in Syracuse) at Darling Hill Observatory, home of the Syracuse Astronomical Society.

2014june20_barlowbob_1_small

Very likely him at Darling Hill Observatory. Click for a larger view.

Our initial plan was for an 11 a.m. set-up and a noon to 3-ish observing session. Saturday morning started a bit earlier than I expected with a phone call at 9:30 a.m. – Barlow Bob, ever ready to be out and about on a clear day, was outside the locked front gate of Darling Hill Observatory. A frantic prep and drive out later, Barlow Bob and I set up and placed his many scopes on the observing grounds to the delight of about 30 attendees. I myself took one look through the Bob-o-Scope and began calling people, telling them “you have to come and see this.” A full day of observing in, Barlow Bob didn’t end up leaving Darling Hill until just before 5 p.m. The hour we took to leisurely pack his station wagon with all of his gear was full of shop talk, people and equipment to be made aware of, and plans on a similar event at some point in the future. That hang and the view through his Bob-o-Scope are two of my favorite memories during my tenure as SAS president.

Barlow Bob and a spectroscopy mini-lecture at Darling Hill Observatory, 30 July 2011.

The Sun, being the excellent, usually accessible target that it is, is ideal for hosting impromptu observing sessions at most any location. Members of CNYO now do as a small group (and with cheaper equipment) what Barlow Bob would do single-handedly – set up and observe “with attitude.”

Not Just NEAF

Barlow Bob is known to many in the community as the founder of the NEAF Solar Star Party and as the author of articles for “Barlow Bob’s Corner.” To those of us with a bent towards public outreach, Barlow Bob is an example of someone who could take some fancy equipment and his own know-how and run a one-host show. Barlow Bob committed a great deal of his own time and talent to doing for our nearest star what those like John Dobson did for far more distant objects. Despite the many, many amateur astronomers in the world today, it’s still a field where a single person can have a strong influence simply by being a perfectly-polished primary mirror that reflects their own love of the field for others to appreciate. Amateur astronomy outreach can learn a lot from Barlow Bob’s example and CNYO will continue in his footsteps of making safe, variously-filtered solar sights available to the public as part of our observing efforts. May we all become a bit more familiar with our nearest star, following in Barlow Bob’s footsteps to observe it “with attitude.”

2014june20_barlowbob_4

“It’s like looking in a mirror!” Barlow Bob and I at Kopernik’s 2013 Astrofest.

* Announcement of his passing on Cloudy Nights: cloudynights.com/ubbthreads/showflat.php/Cat/0/Number/6581115/Main/6578514

* David Eicher’s announcement at astronomy.com: cs.astronomy.com/asy/b/daves-universe/archive/2014/06/16/solar-astronomy-guru-quot-barlow-bob-quot-dies.aspx

* A memorial webpage at forevermissed.com: http://www.forevermissed.com/robert-a-godfrey/

Gig Announcement: Juneteenth Jazz at the Hotel Utica, Saturday, June 14th

June 10th, 2014

2014june10_Juneteenth2014_small

The Matthew Rockwell Group (like on the facebook) will be making the trip out to Utica this coming Saturday, June 14th as part of the entertainment for the For The Good, Inc.’s Juneteenth Jazz Night event, sharing the stage with some notable Utica heavy hitters.

2014june10_sparkytown

The band at Sparkytown, 23 May 2014. Photo by Jack M. Hardendorf.

From the website:

For the Good will host the 2014 Juneteenth Jazz Night at The Hotel Utica on June 14th, 2014.  The fun starts at 6:30 PM and the event will end at 10:30.  The price of tickets is $35.00 pre sale, $40 at the door.  A Soul Food meal will be offered and Night Over packages at the hotel are an option as well.  For more information contact the offices of For The Good, Inc. at (315) 797-2417.

About For The Good, Inc.

For the Good, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization founded in 2002 and based in historic Utica, New York. FTG works to benefit the Utica community providing low-income residents and their neighborhoods with programs to overcome poverty through their own means. For The Good has established itself a valuable, productive contributor to the community. FTG is home to the Utica Phoenix, an independent paid monthly newspaper, Mohawk Valley Entrepreneurs Guild, Utica’s Urban Community Gardening Initiative which has fed hundreds of Utica residents at risk for hunger since 2008, The Oneida County Black History Archive and the Study Buddy Club, which connects inner city teens with Hamilton College mentors for academic tutoring. For The Good also promotes the art of Paul Parker as executor of the Paul Parker Utica Trust.

For the Good invites collaboration with individuals, businesses, other not-for-profits, and the greater Utica community on youth empowerment and economic development projects. We strive to give under-represented Utica residents a voice, and facilitate a better quality of life for the entire community.

Obligatory

  • CNYO

  • Sol. Sys. Amb.

  • Salt City Miners

  • Ubuntu 4 Nano

  • NMT Review

  • N-Fact. Collab.

  • T R P Nanosys

  • Nano Gallery

  • nano gallery
  • Aerial Photos

    More @ flickr.com

    Syracuse Scenes

    More @ flickr.com